Saturnian Verse

Saturnian verse, also called Saturnian meter, was the ancient Latin form used mainly by Livius Andronicus and Gnaeus Naevius. Later Latin writers adopted Greek verse forms, which they considered more sophisticated than the native tradition. The meter was moribund by the time of the literary verses and forgotten altogether by classical times. Little is known about its origins or whether its rhythm was accentual or quantitative. A large number of the Saturnian verses have a 4 || 3 || 3 || 3 syllable count and division, which scholars have been inclined to take as underlying or ideal. One possible scheme is three iambs ( ˘ ¯ ) followed by a long ( ¯ ) or short ( ˘ ) syllable, then three trochees
( ¯ ˘ ) for a total of thirteen syllables. Think Mother Goose: The queen was in the parlor || eating bread and honey.

Saturnian Verse

An ancient Roman meter sadly fell from favor.
A pause in cadence happens midway through its measures.
The trochees follow iambs; rhyming doesn't matter.
The later Roman poets opted out for Greek forms.

Classical Saturnian Verses

A Saturnalian Saturnian Verse

A feast day mid-December honors Saturn's glory,
And cries of "Io!" resounding fill the air with gladness.
A topsy-turvy time dawns... brief-but-welcome respite.
The master-slave arrangement, dicing, pranking, lazing
Around return to normal when the time is over.

Title

three iambs + extra syllable || three trochees
three iambs + extra syllable || three trochees
three iambs + extra syllable || three trochees
three iambs + extra syllable || three trochees
three iambs + extra syllable || three trochees


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